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Episode #43 - The Everywhere Man
Original Airdate - November 4th, 2006

When evidence from a series of art thefts by a new costumed villain with the power to replicate implicates a close friend, Batman believes there must be another explanation.  Now the Dark Knight must unmask the identity of this rouge called the “Everywhere Man” and prove his friend's innocence.

Reviews by The Penguin
Media by Bird Boy, Rick
Credits
Written by Greg Weisman
Directed by Brandon Vietti
Music by Thomas Chase Jones
Animation by Lotto Animation

Voices
Rino Romano as The Batman/Bruce Wayne
Evan Sabara as Robin/Dick Grayson
Alastair Duncan as Alfred
Brandon Routh as Marlowe/Everywhere Man
Allison Mack as Clea

Video

Screen Grabs






Pans

Review

"Oh come now, Batman, how long do you really think you can last? It hardly matters how many of me you break, I'll just make more."

On the surface, this is a fine, but not outstanding episode. It's no "Q&A," but it's no "A Matter of Family" either. It has another friend of Bruce Wayne, voice work from a famous actor and an almost assuredly one-shot villain. The strong parts of "The Everywhere Man" are in the details.

The new Superman, Brandon Routh, visits the animated DC world in a fine performance as John Marlowe/ Everywhere Man and I found it interesting that Marlowe's hair happens to look like a 'do we would see on the man himself. Anyway, the best part of the vocals is the differences between Marlowe and the Everywhere Man. Batman certainly isn't able to figure out they are the same (more or less) just by listening to them as there is a significant enough difference in the vocals of the two characters.

The way Batman does start to put the pieces together is some "World's Greatest Detective" action which we don't see in every episode. The use of Bruce Wayne to easily get into a place The Batman would have some explaining to do was well-done and it was great seeing something a little different in that regard. The eventual reveal that the friend is not the villain at all, but a victim himself was also an interesting play.

"Okay, so my broom theory was way off."

Robin being Robin was another highlight of this episode. The teenager brought out a lot of youthful charm and sensibilities as he both helped The Batman and did some work on his own, reconnecting with his mentor at just the right time. All that plus Alfred getting more involved again, there was a really feeling of a Bat-family here.

 

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